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Bartitsu is an eclectic martial art and self-defence method originally developed in England during the years 1898–1902. In 1903, it was immortalised (as "baritsu") by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, author of the Sherlock Holmes mystery stories. Although dormant throughout most of the 20th century, Bartitsu has been experiencing a revival since 2002. Bartitsu

 

In 1898, Edward William Barton-Wright, a British engineer who had spent the previous three years living in the Empire of Japan, returned to England and announced the formation of a "New Art of Self Defence". This art, he claimed, combined the best elements of a range of fighting styles into a unified whole, which he had named Bartitsu. Barton-Wright had previously also studied "boxing, wrestling, fencing, savate and the use of the stiletto under recognised masters", reportedly testing his skills by "engaging toughs (street fighters) until (he) was satisfied in their application." He defined Bartitsu as meaning "self defence in all its forms"; the word was a portmanteau of his own surname and of "Jujitsu". (Description from Wikipedia)

 

Bartitsu Society: http://www.bartitsu.org/ 

E.W. Barton-Wright's Sherlock Holmes School of Self Defence (Book): Sherlock Holmes School of Self Defence

 

Bartitsu: The Gentleman's Martial Art

 

Bartitsu: How to Fight Like Sherlock Holmes

 

 

Bartitsu Mini Documentary

 

Bartitsu Seminar with Tony Wolf